5 Exercises for Knee Strengthening with Osteoarthritis

5 Exercises for Knee Strengthening with Osteoarthritis

Health content
Strength training is hard with knee pain. Trust me, I've had three knee surgeries, and often struggle with it too. This week, we are providing resources for people that are looking for osteoarthritis treatment at the gym safely and effectively.  The exercises we'll be covering in this video are: Kitchen sink squat Heel rock back Bentover row, and Knee blocked squat. Knee Blocked Squats Too much force through the knees is often a cause of knee pain. We can use the prop of a box, door frame, or chair to encourage a backwards weight shift. This recruits the hamstrings and glutes to do their very important job. I like to try this exercise with folks that have knee pain with squatting, going from sitting to standing, and rising from…
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Modify Your Risk of Chronic Disease

Modify Your Risk of Chronic Disease

Health content
Most people are aware of the common risk factors for their health. Smoking, drinking, and eating unhealthy foods - all can contribute to chronic conditions. I enjoy having a beer with my friends, and I know that that might not always be good for me. It is important that these activities be weighed against the overall risk to your life. Today, we're going to tackle the biggest three risk factors over the next few videos. Today, we'll be focusing on aging. I would encourage you to just pay special attention to these as you go through your day. First, some important terms to define: Risk Factor: something that increases risk Chronic Disease: a broad term for a condition that lasts more than 1 year and requires ongoing medical attention. Aging I'm gonna…
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Why Strong Bones Matter

Why Strong Bones Matter

Health content
Hi everyone, Dr. Donovan here. Really excited to share what we have today on why bones matter. It's something I educate people a lot on in the clinic; how their osteoporosis profile relates to what they can do, and what they maybe shouldn't do. All of these include lifestyle modifications and different ways of moving your spine and hips to help protect them over time. Most importantly, they lower your fall risk. Lowering your fall risk will mitigate any risk of acute fracture. When we discuss osteoporosis, we're talking about bone mineral density and osteopenia. It is most common in older adults and mainly postmenopausal women, but that doesn't mean you should stop caring about your bones even if you don't have a degenerative bone disease; it's something to maintain…
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5 Simple Ways (Not Exercises!) to Prevent Falls When You’re an Older Adult

5 Simple Ways (Not Exercises!) to Prevent Falls When You’re an Older Adult

Balance, Health content
Nearly 30 million falls are recorded every year among seniors, resulting in more than 27,000 deaths. Unfortunately, fall death rates are on the rise, increasing 30 percent between 2007 and 2016. But falling doesn't have to be an accepted of aging.  You may already be doing balance exercises and making sure you get regular physical activity. But did you know that there are other things you could be doing that do not involve exercise but still can significantly decrease your risk of falling? Here are our top five. 1Start a fall prevention plan with your doctor The first step in preventing falls is scheduling an appointment with your physician. Go over your medications with the doctor to determine whether any of them might be increasing your risk of falling. Also…
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Improve Your Balance, Improve Your Life

Improve Your Balance, Improve Your Life

Arthritis, Balance, knowledge, Prevention
Balance As A Vital Sign Our annual doctor’s check-up is comprehensive - blood pressure, weight, cholesterol levels - are often measured to determine your health profile. But how is your balance measured? Your ability to maintain balance under various situations should also be considered in your health profile. Unfortunately, one out of three older people falls each year, but less than half tell their doctor. Falls can diminish your ability to lead an active and independent life. Research has identified many conditions that contribute to falling. These are called risk factors. The more risk factors you have, the greater your risk. Fall risk is multifactorial but individualized to each older adult. Lets take a look at contributing factors you can change, factors you cannot change, and how a Physical Therapist…
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