Advanced Osteoarthritis and Athletes: How Physical Therapy Can Help You Return To Competitive Sports

Advanced Osteoarthritis and Athletes: How Physical Therapy Can Help You Return To Competitive Sports

Arthritis, Exercise, Health content, knowledge, Pain
Joint pain can make even everyday activities challenging. For athletes, the degenerative pain of osteoarthritis can feel especially devastating. If you're used to the challenges and health benefits of participating in sports, slowing down is a big adjustment. The good news is that you may not have to give up your sport for long. With the right physical therapy and pain medication, you can get back to the activities you love, including athletics. What is advanced osteoarthritis? Osteoarthritis is a condition that occurs when the cartilage that lines your joints starts to break down. Cartilage acts like a shock absorber when there is impact. If improperly stressed, over time the cartilage starts to crumble. It can occur in any joint on your body and is commonly seen in the knees…
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How to Prepare for Your Total Knee Replacement

How to Prepare for Your Total Knee Replacement

Arthritis, Health content, knee
Total knee replacement surgery, sometimes known as knee arthroplasty, is a common procedure to reduce pain and improve movement. Your doctor might order this procedure if you have osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis or other joint condition. If you need total knee replacement surgery, you'll generally have a couple months to prepare. The road to recovery starts even before the first incision is made. There are steps you can take to make the best use of your waiting time and to help increase your chances for a successful procedure and recovery. Before your total knee replacement surgery It's helpful to have a plan in place for your upcoming surgery. Being organized will help you feel less overwhelmed during the days before and after your surgery. First, make a list of your medical information.…
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Don’t Let Osteoporosis Hold You Back! Maintain and Build Your Bone Density

Don’t Let Osteoporosis Hold You Back! Maintain and Build Your Bone Density

Arthritis
Osteoporosis (OP) screening is now on many doctors’ radar for patients as young as age 50, especially for those at high risk. Previously, osteoporosis would typically not be diagnosed until a fracture occurred. Today's practice of earlier screening gives the patient a better chance of avoiding the worst effects of OP. Do you have OP? Affecting more than 200 million people around the world, OP is the most common bone disease in humans. People with OP have low bone density, low bone mass and changes in their bone structure. All of these changes cause bones to break more easily. Think of bones as having an internal structure like a honeycomb. People with osteoporosis have more space in their honeycombs than people who do not have the disease. The walls of…
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Improve Your Balance, Improve Your Life

Improve Your Balance, Improve Your Life

Arthritis, Balance, knowledge, Prevention
Balance As A Vital Sign Our annual doctor’s check-up is comprehensive - blood pressure, weight, cholesterol levels - are often measured to determine your health profile. But how is your balance measured? Your ability to maintain balance under various situations should also be considered in your health profile. Unfortunately, one out of three older people falls each year, but less than half tell their doctor. Falls can diminish your ability to lead an active and independent life. Research has identified many conditions that contribute to falling. These are called risk factors. The more risk factors you have, the greater your risk. Fall risk is multifactorial but individualized to each older adult. Lets take a look at contributing factors you can change, factors you cannot change, and how a Physical Therapist…
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Your Quick Guide to Understand Hip Arthritis

Arthritis, Health content, Hip, Pain
Arthritis of the hip is a common condition physical therapists see in the clinic. It is diagnosed most frequently in patients over 60 years of age and is caused by damage to the joint’s cartilage. Actually, this bone and cartilage relationship starts much earlier, in your 20s and 30s, but comes into focus only once the joint damage is defined by pain. Running, skiing, sitting – all these movements add up to your arthritic pain in the long run. Let’s start from the beginning. Your hip joint is covered by cartilage. Think of cartilage as the lubricant and your joint as the engine. This lubrication allows for smooth engine operation during activity. Over time, life’s movement patterns can pull your hip joint slightly out of alignment. This misalignment increases joint…
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