Keeping Your Body and Brain Healthy Into Your 90s

Keeping Your Body and Brain Healthy Into Your 90s

Health content
When it comes to life expectancy and how good you feel as you age, there are many factors at play. You can't control your genetics, but you can give yourself a big advantage by making healthy lifestyle choices. Get smart about your diet, activity level, daily routine and habits to increase your chances of staying healthy into your 90s. Steps to staying healthy longer If you want to boost your chances of living a longer, healthier life, some of the most important steps you can take are lifestyle changes: Quit smoking.Take all your medications as prescribed by your doctor.Get at least 150 minutes of exercise a week.Eat a heart-healthy diet that includes lots of vegetables, whole grains and lean protein but limited amounts of red meat, fat, and sugar.Drink in…
Read More
5 Simple Ways (Not Exercises!) to Prevent Falls When You’re an Older Adult

5 Simple Ways (Not Exercises!) to Prevent Falls When You’re an Older Adult

Balance, Health content
Nearly 30 million falls are recorded every year among seniors, resulting in more than 27,000 deaths. Unfortunately, fall death rates are on the rise, increasing 30 percent between 2007 and 2016. But falling doesn't have to be an accepted of aging.  You may already be doing balance exercises and making sure you get regular physical activity. But did you know that there are other things you could be doing that do not involve exercise but still can significantly decrease your risk of falling? Here are our top five. 1Start a fall prevention plan with your doctor The first step in preventing falls is scheduling an appointment with your physician. Go over your medications with the doctor to determine whether any of them might be increasing your risk of falling. Also…
Read More
Sexual Function in Older Women and the Role of Physical Therapy

Sexual Function in Older Women and the Role of Physical Therapy

Health content, knowledge
Every aging woman who has experienced menopause knows that it changes her body, from bone loss and a higher risk of heart disease to bladder leakage, also known as urinary incontinence. Menopause can change your body's ability to function sexually as well, including your level of sexual desire. Physical changes that affect sex Some of the physical changes that make sex difficult are predictable and typically occur post-menopause. Being aware means that you can plan for these changes and address them so you can continue to enjoy sex long after menopause has brought you to a new stage of life. Common predictable changes include: Vaginal atrophy. The walls of the vagina become thinner and drier, making them more prone to inflammation. This can make sex painful.Urinary tract symptoms. Some women…
Read More
Sexual Function in Older Men and the Role of Physical Therapy

Sexual Function in Older Men and the Role of Physical Therapy

Health content, knowledge
Men over the age of 40 know that testosterone gradually declines as they age. Fear not—this is perfectly normal. Still, sexual dysfunction causes side effects that can be distressing for men as well as their sexual partners. If you're an older man, you should be able to experience healthy sexual function for many years to come, although it may take some support at different stages. What can men expect as they age? The natural decline of testosterone in men causes decreased testicular function. In daily life, this often manifests as: Lower sexual interest in general.Feeling less arousal or requiring more stimulation to get aroused.Less success at achieving an erection and ejaculating. More aging complications Chronic diseases like diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure add to performance difficulties. On top…
Read More
Sarcopenia: What Age-Related Muscle Loss Does to You (And How to Overcome It)

Sarcopenia: What Age-Related Muscle Loss Does to You (And How to Overcome It)

Health content
Getting older can feel as if it's about all things new: new aches and pains, new medications, new conditions. While most seniors are aware of new symptoms relating to diseases like dementia, arthritis and diabetes, many don't know much about sarcopenia, the medical term for naturally occurring, age-related muscle loss. According to the International Osteoporosis Foundation, sarcopenia typically starts at about age 40, but the patients we see in physical therapy tend to be in their 60s. Sarcopenia falls under the umbrella of "clinical geriatric syndromes," which refers to conditions that coincide with advancing age but do not have a single cause. It can correlate with a sedentary lifestyle, an unbalanced diet, and chronic inflammation. How age-related muscle loss affects seniors Studies show that low muscle mass contributes to mobility…
Read More