Staying Active for the Health of Your Heart

Staying Active for the Health of Your Heart

Exercise
Sooner or later, many of us receive a heart-related diagnosis. This can actually be a positive development, because it motivates us to take a fresh look at our lifestyle. Heart disease diagnoses Affecting 28.2 million Americans and the leading causing of death in the U.S., "heart disease" is a term used broadly to cover several different diagnoses. Common diagnoses related to heart disease include: Coronary artery disease. The vessels that pump blood to your heart are damaged or weakened.High blood pressure, also called hypertension. The force of blood pumping through your body is increased, putting stress on your heart and arteries.Congestive heart failure. Your heart is not pumping blood as well as a healthy heart does.Arrhythmia. Your heartbeat is abnormal—your heart is beating either slower or faster than than it…
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Don’t Let Osteoporosis Hold You Back! Maintain and Build Your Bone Density

Don’t Let Osteoporosis Hold You Back! Maintain and Build Your Bone Density

Arthritis
Osteoporosis (OP) screening is now on many doctors’ radar for patients as young as age 50, especially for those at high risk. Previously, osteoporosis would typically not be diagnosed until a fracture occurred. Today's practice of earlier screening gives the patient a better chance of avoiding the worst effects of OP. Do you have OP? Affecting more than 200 million people around the world, OP is the most common bone disease in humans. People with OP have low bone density, low bone mass and changes in their bone structure. All of these changes cause bones to break more easily. Think of bones as having an internal structure like a honeycomb. People with osteoporosis have more space in their honeycombs than people who do not have the disease. The walls of…
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A Little Stiff? Older Adults Benefit from Flexibility Training

A Little Stiff? Older Adults Benefit from Flexibility Training

Prevention
Information abounds for older adults about the importance of cardio and strength training, but there’s less data available on flexibility training. However, a handful of studies do show that improving flexibility is key for increasing your comfort and longevity as you age.   Why do you need flexibility? Flexibility refers to how easily you bend and how much range of motion you have in your joints. As we age, our muscles and tendons tighten and atrophy, and our joints become stiff, causing a reduction in flexibility. Tight muscles can act as a splint on a joint, preventing it from moving properly. Lower flexibility makes it harder for us to do everyday things, such as: Sit downStand upRoll over in bedGet dressedTake a bath or showerClean the houseWalk the dogReach for…
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Everything You Need to Know About Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Everything You Need to Know About Osteoarthritis of the Knee

Health content, Prevention
If you're one of the more than 250 million people suffering with osteoarthritis (OA), you probably struggle with pain and decreased mobility. And if you're not, you may want to take preventive measures to avoid joining the roughly 10 percent of men and 13 percent of women over the age of 60 who have osteoarthritis of the knee—a key joint for so many everyday movements. Symptoms of osteoarthritis of the knee Pain is the hallmark symptom of osteoarthritis of the knee as well as of other joints. Sufferers often experience "pain flares"—short episodes of intense and unpredictable pain. As a result, people with arthritis of the knee may shy away from participating in social or physical activity to avoid triggering a flare. 4 progressive stages of osteoarthritis of the knee…
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After A Stroke, Therapy Can Help You Regain Physical and Cognitive Function

After A Stroke, Therapy Can Help You Regain Physical and Cognitive Function

Health content, knowledge
You might find that you have a hard time returning to your daily life and routines after having a stroke. Since a stroke causes brain damage, it will affect your entire body—but this doesn't mean a stroke has to slow you down permanently. With the help of medical professionals, you can regain many of your abilities as you recover. How is life different after a stroke? The effects of a stroke vary from person to person. Some people may see very few effects, while others may have severe complications that include: One-sided weaknessCommunication difficultyLimb numbnessFull or partial paralysisVision challengesCognitive decline Any one of these complications can make movements that used to come naturally seem nearly impossible. You can read more about life after a stroke on the American Stroke Association's…
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